Assessment

  • Unit of Measurement
    • We would measure mostly at the community level, meaning at the camp and village level. We may also do some measurement at the household level. We would do so because although the camps and villages are easily divisible units, sometimes these are unnatural communities with people who would not normally live together forced to do so as a result of forced migration.
  • Sampling - Who you would sample? What areas will you target? What sampling methods you would use?
    • We would sample the camps and villages. Because of time constraints, as well as the inexperience of the social workers, it isn’t feasible to measure all 150 camps.
    • We would use purposive sampling because it can give us a “big picture” measure and sense of the scale and priorities that will be sufficient enough to begin planning. We’ll also be able to see how the emergency has impacted the different groups we sample.
    • We would want to ensure a proportionate number of town camps and nearby villages were included in the assessment. We would also ensure that all ethnic groups were included, as well as groups speaking different languages. We would also sample from different geographical areas since the location of each camp or village settlement will affect the child protection situation.
  • Objectives - What are your primary objectives – or research questions – for the assessment?
    • Our primary objectives would be to determine the scale of child protection needs and risks, what our priorities should be in a response, how to organize that response, and what local capacities and resources exist.
    • Our main research question would be – what are the main issues that children are facing as a result of the natural disaster?
    • We would want to know the answers to more specific questions, such as: How many separated or unaccompanied children are there? How are these children surviving without their parents, what are their coping mechanisms (living with other family/friends, begging, etc)? Is there any forced labor, sexual exploitation, recruitment into fighting forces, violence against children, or trafficking occurring?
  • Methodology - What methods will you employ in the assessment?
    • We would employ a variety of assessment methods
      • Desk review – We would review existing data from other assessments that may include information about child protection (health, nutrition, etc). We would also use knowledge about the culture of the displaced people to understand children’s place within the culture, and how they may or may not be protected during the emergency. This would not consume many resources (time, money), and can be done without extensive training of how to conduct interviews, administer questionnaires, etc. The local social workers will also have insight by virtue of being from the area.
      • Key informant interviews – We would speak with camp or village leaders, as well as caregivers, teachers, and others usually responsible for the care of children. We would also want to speak with mothers and fathers separately. We would employ this method because it will allow us to get a representative voice from each community that we assess without lengthy and resource-consuming focus group discussions.
      • PRM – We would choose this method because it is an effective way for less skilled people (social workers) to come away with useful information.
  • Validity – How will you ensure your findings are valid?
    • Using an array of methodology will ensure the validity of our findings. As Lindsey spoke about with her recent experience in Indonesia, using a variety of assessment methods can allow for the triangulation of information and filling in gaps. Whereas some topics may not be discovered with a desk review, interviews with key informant may bring them up.
  • Analysis – Who will lead the data analysis? What methods will be used in the analysis of the data?
    • The team leader would lead the data analysis in coordination with the social workers. Because the social workers do not have much experience with child protection issues, we would want to make sure to sit down and analyze the data with them instead of leaving it for them to do independently.
    • We would use descriptive analysis because it is one of the easiest data analysis methods, and the social workers could run it without too much instruction. We would use a frequency analysis to determine what are the major child protection issues facing the displaced population.
  • Coordination – Who will be responsible for collecting which types of data? How will data be collected and transferred for analysis? How will the information be shared, and with whom will it be shared?
    • The social workers would be responsible for collecting all types of data.
    • Daily debriefing sessions would allow for data collection. This would also allow the team leader/supervisor to review the data each social worker has collected, and point out where further clarification is needed.
    • At the end of the data collection period, the supervisor would collect all the data from the social workers in order to analyze it.
    • After all the data is analyzed, we would ideally hold a small meeting to discuss the main findings among the social workers and other actors, including the key informants who were interviewed and others involved in child protection activities. We would also produce a briefing document to share with our headquarters, other agencies involved with child protection, our donors, and the local government.
  • Time line – How long will you spend training the team? How long will the assessment take? What will the general day-to-day plan be? How long will the analysis take? What methods will be used for analysis?
    • 1. Training team --- 3 days. For the first day, we will provide the outline of the study, and then teach the social workers to whom and how to reach the samples. For the second day, we will provide the training of the actual assessment tools. For the third day, we will do a role-playing activity and answer remaining questions.
    • 2. Assessment --- 6 days. Since we chose 30 camps to study, and since there are 10 social workers, each social worker have 3 camps. So for example, day1=camp1, day2=camp2, day3=camp3, day4=camp1, day5=camp2, day6=camp3. The social workers would go to each camp at least twice in order to have a chance to return and clarify information after the initial assessment.
    • 3. Analysis --- 3 days. Since the team leaders/supervisors are doing analysis, three days would be enough.
    • 4. Day-to-day --- We would hold a daily team meeting from 9-10, and then have data collection (assessment) from 10-5. We might also have debriefing meetings after each day of assessment. The daily meetings and debriefing sessions would allow the unskilled social workers time to ask questions, and a chance for the supervisors to respond and provide further training.